Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club, its Director, Barry Bailey, four members of Bristol and Wessex staff, including those involved in aircraft fuelling and reception, have been referred to the Competition and Markets Authority for abuse of a ‘Dominant market position at Bristol Airport.’

  • Post published:June 14, 2022

Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club, its Director, Barry Bailey, four members of Bristol and Wessex staff, including those involved in aircraft fuelling and reception, have been referred to the Competition and Markets Authority for abuse of a ‘Dominant market position at Bristol Airport.’
A Business that is found to have breached competition law can be;
● fined up to 10 per cent of their annual worldwide turnover and ordered to change their behaviour.
● Individuals who engage in cartel activity can be prosecuted and sentenced for up to five years in prison and/or a fine.
● Company Directors can be disqualified from managing a company for up to 15 years.
It is alleged that Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club, which is an Agent for Bristol Airport, and some of it’s employees, have barred customers of other companies, pilots and some members of the public from entering Belvedere House and it’s car park, a Bristol Airport building.

Evidence have been supplied to the Competition and Markets Authority including correspondence from Bristol and Wessex Airplane Club saying, “to introduce myself, my name is Jez Daniels, I’m the general manager of B&W Aeroplane club. I have been made aware of a decision, taken some time ago, to prohibit you from entering or using the clubs premises and / or facilities. To avoid any potential confusion or future embarrassment, could I politely remind you that this includes any external areas, including but not limited to, car parks and external seating areas. Our staff have been made aware of this restriction on your access to B&W facilities but I would ask, to prevent the requirement for their intervention, that you respect the clubs decision and stay clear of all of its premises and facilities.”

It is also alleged that Bristol and Wessex employees refused to supply a fuelling service to selected aircraft, risking flight safety and endangering pilots and passengers. Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club exercises a monopoly to supply fuel to light aircraft, given to it by Bristol Airport.

Also, that Bristol and Wessex reception staff, who have a monopoly on receiving members of the public at Belvedere House, made misleading statements to visitors and also misled customers of other businesses, in an effort to advance the business activities of Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club over others.

The Competition and Markets Authority states that all businesses, whatever their size, must understand how they’re affected by competition law.
They must follow the rules on all types of anti-competitive activity including:
● price fixing, bid-rigging and other ways of agreeing not to compete (sometimes called ‘cartels’)
● abuse of a dominant market position
They should manage the risk of breaking the law, for example, by having clear policies, guidelines and training for staff. Anyone can report anti-competitive activity if they think another business is breaking the law.
Businesses that are found to have breached competition law can be
● fined up to 10 per cent of their annual worldwide turnover and ordered to change their behaviour.

● Individuals who engage in cartel activity can be prosecuted and sentenced for up to five years in prison and/or a fine.
● Company directors can be disqualified from managing a company for up to 15 years.
The people who run businesses are responsible for ensuring it does not break competition law.
They should:
● work out where a business is at risk and how serious any risks are

● set up policies, guidelines and training for staff if needed

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/competing-fairly-in-business-at-a-glance-guide-to-competition-law/competing-fairly-in-business