Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club, who’s Managing Director is Barry Bailey, breaches Court Order

  • Post published:March 18, 2022

Picture: Barry Bailey’s interview to BBC Point West in 2020 when he omitted to mention that that his company owed a debt to Richard Nightingale of Professional Flying Ltd, trading as Bristol Flying.

A recent Court order was made against Bristol and Wessex Aeroplane Club Ltd, following its Director Bailey Bailey’s refusal to pay debts owed since 2018, to Professional Flying, known as Bristol Flying, whose Managing Director is Richard Nightingale. The Court gave Mr Bailey’s company a deadline of Wednesday 16.03.22 to make payment; however this did not take place.
Richard Nightingale said, “My experience of Mr Bailey is of an extremely wealthy person who dislikes people who disagree with him. When I have not shared his opinion on previous occasions, we would very swiftly receive a solicitor’s letter reaffirming his position: again, in my opinion, his wealth may have isolated him from those less fortunate, but I am saying that no-one is above the judicial system and I am shocked that Mr Bailey has chosen to breach a Court order in this matter, especially as the debt has been outstanding since 2018. Sadly, it looks as if Professional Flying Ltd will need to involve High Court Bailiffs to recover the debt owed.”

“Sadly, I have witnessed this kind of behaviour before from Barry Bailey. After an extremely cold winter in 2017, Bristol Flying campaigned heavily to raise funds for the homeless. As part of the campaign, a number of business owners, including Barry Bailey, pledged to contribute to the local homeless centre to keep it open. As a thank you by the shelter, Barry Bailey’s pledge was advertised widely. Mr Bailey’s staff even attended a joint photo opportunity with the local media to mark the promised contribution. This contribution, however, was never made by Mr Bailey and even though he was reminded about his promise on several occasions. It maybe be that the amount of the pledge, £2000, is probably a small amount of money to Barry Bailey, however it could have provided several extra beds to vulnerable adults, additional bed space that would have been offered to protect them from sub zero weather.”